A point not mentioned by advocates of adding EpiPens to a federal list of preventive medical services is that a big potential beneficiary of the campaign is Mylan, the pharmaceutical giant behind the device. WASHINGTON — Against a growing outcry over the surging price of EpiPens, a chorus of prominent voices has emerged with a smart-sounding solution: Add the EpiPen, the lifesaving allergy treatment, to a federal list of preventive medical services, a move that would eliminate the out-of-pocket costs of the product for millions of families — and mute the protests. Dr. Leonard Fromer, a clinical professor of family medicine at UCLA, just promoted the idea in the prestigious American Journal of Medicine. A few groups are preparing a formal request to the government. And Tonya Winders, who runs a patient-advocacy nonprofit organization, late last month contacted crucial lawmakers on Capitol Hill. “We can save lives by ensuring access to these medications,” said Winders, chief executive of the Allergy and Asthma Network. A point not mentioned by these advocates is that a big potential beneficiary of the campaign is Mylan, the pharmaceutical giant behind EpiPens. The company would be able to continue charging high prices for the product without patients complaining about the cost. An examination of the campaign by The New York Times, including interviews with more than a dozen people, shows Mylan is aware of that benefit and has been helping orchestrate and pay for the effort. The journal article says it was “drafted and revised” [...]